This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Dan Prater 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #16839

    Gordon miller
    Participant

    Does anyone have any advise about a kayak for someone at 300 lbs..I’m a fair open boater but I think it’s too much on my ankles. Was looking at the pyrana h3 255 but honestly I have no idea.

  • #16856

    JulieAlsberge
    Participant

    Jackson super hero

  • #16857

    Dan Prater
    Participant

    Put a kayak seat in your canoe.  Ive seen you boat,  doubt it would make a difference one way or the other

  • #16859

    Gordon miller
    Participant

    As always dan your advise is super helpful and appreciated

  • #16863

    Sheldon Dale
    Participant

    The biggest real whitewater kayak I’ve seen is the Jackson Karma. I think the large version is rated up to 300 lbs.

  • #16864

    Gordon miller
    Participant

    Hey thanks sheldon..I was wondering your opinion on it actually being a bigger boater…Definitely the biggest one I’ve seen as well

     

  • #16865

    Sheldon Dale
    Participant

    I’d say it depends on what you want to do on the water. For example, I used to paddle a MegaRocker but after I got past the beginner stage, it drove me crazy, because it had no edges which made it extremely hard to ferry and peel out. On the other hand, No Eddy Freddie loved his MegaRocker because he just wanted to go down river.

    I think the Karma is a step up from the MegaRocker, but it’s far from perfect. Chris Gagnon described the Karma well by saying it will carve … but you have to touch your ear to the water to make it do it.  On the other hand, I think it is very comfortable.  I have a large Karma and I call it the LazyBoy recliner of kayaks. But with relatively little edge it’s harder to  make it stay on a surf wave. It requires a lot more paddle work.  I checked Jackson’s website and it looks like they are no longer making the Karma. But the large Zen 3 is the same volume as the Karma at 103 gallons and is rated up to 280 lbs.  And their large Nirvana is around 97 gallons, but haven’t padded either of those boats.

    I also have an extra large Pyranha Burn, which comes in at 90 gallons, but I’m at the upper end of the weight range for that boat. The last few times I paddled it I noticed that I was catching an edge more  than I should. But if I were 20 or 30blbs lighter it would be my favorite boat because of those edges.  Surfing, carving into an eddy, ferrying, and peeling out are really fun in that boat.  Pyranha also has the Machno which is 98 gallons, but I haven’t padded it.

    If I were looking for a brand new kayak, I’d be interested in the Machno or the Zen.  You’d be welcome to paddle my Karma or Burn, but I don’t know when I’ll be over that way again.

    ON THE OTHER HAND, why ditch the canoe? I have actually been thinking about trying one because 1) I’m not crazy about paddling a kayak at the upper end of its weight range and most of the canoes are huge so it wouldn’t be an issue; and 2) I don’t paddle much in cold weather anymore. Stuffing myself into a spray skirt and closed cockpit in 90° weather is miserable. An open boat just sounds a lot more comfortable to me from that standpoint.

    If I want to try out an open boat, what would you recommend?

  • #16867

    Dan Prater
    Participant

    Sounds like yall should trade boats.

     

    Sheldon,  come paddle with Ben and I. He usually brings a couple boats and you’re always welcome to try my octane.

    Octane 91 and silverbirch covert 10.5 are the big guy stable sleds.  Older traditional canoe canoes in the same line would be anything like dagger caption, ovation and similar.

    You’d be a natural in an open boat, and

    we need a nice guy to round out this group of assholes!

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